About Us

HEADWAY THAMES VALLEY

As a local, independent charity we promote wider understanding of all aspects of brain injury and provide information, support and services to people with an acquired brain injury (ABI), their families and carers in the Thames Valley.

A brain injury happens in seconds and the effects can last a lifetime. More than one million people a year in the UK attend hospital after a brain injury.  Approximately 4000 people have some form of ABI in the Thames Valley each year, although many might have no long-term residual symptoms.  Accidents do not discriminate.  It could happen to you, a friend or a member of your family.  There are many possible causes, including a fall, a road accident, sports injury, tumour, stroke, cardiac arrest, complications during operations and post viral infections such as meningitis.

We seek to improve the lives of adults with ABI and to raise awareness of the causes and effects of brain injury. Our dedicated team of clinicians, support workers and volunteers provide help and rehabilitation therapies in various forms; physiotherapy, occupational therapy, neuropsychology, clinical counselling as well as cognitive stimulation and teaching coping strategies to people with a brain injury.

From our hub in Henley-on-Thames, three satellites, the outreach community enablement programme and the Living with Brain Injury Groups we provide services across the Thames Valley to more than 100 clients each week. If you need help or advice, please contact us on telephone: 01491 411469.  You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter. 

Please take a few moments to view the other pages of our web site which we hope you will find helpful in understanding all aspects of acquired brain injury and how we can help.

History

The charity was started as Headway Berkshire in 1987 in Battle Hospital by Roseanne Barnett – the mother of a young man who had been injured in a road traffic accident. At the end of his NHS rehabilitation she asked his doctor what was next, the doctor said ‘There is no next’.

Knowing that further progress was possible for her son and that he would need to find meaningful things to do for the rest of his life, she got the charity started for him and other people like him in the Thames Valley area.  The charity later moved to Townlands Hospital in Henley. Due to the hospital’s proposed development it had to find alternative accommodation and moved to its present home in Greys Road, Henley in 2008.

Sadly Roseanne and her son have both now passed away. Roseanne was  a warm hearted lady who just wanted to help but she also had a tough side enabling her to get the charity off the ground, winning a Heart of Gold in 1989 for her efforts.